Porteños

Fileteado – A Porteño Art

Fileteado is as porteño as a flock of riled-up Boca fans, although perhaps a little more sedate. It is a form of decorative art that originally started out adorning wagons in Buenos Aires in the early 20th century, painted by the Italian immigrants who worked in the wagon factories. Soon, it began to appear on trucks and buses and can now be seen everywhere from shop windows to metal plates sold at market stalls to giant advertising billboards looming over Avenida 9 de Julio.

 

Porteño Slang Survival Dictionary: Speak Spanish Like a Buenos Aires Native

You thought you knew how to speak Spanish in your language class, with a teacher that seemed to come from Spain (olé!) or even worse, learned from one. Then you come to Argentina and discover that “cana” doesn’t mean what you thought – instead of “a person with grey hair,” it means “the police!” Don’t despair! Here is a list of Porteño slang terms that you can use to quickly sound like a local in Buenos Aires.

 

How to Act Like a Local in Buenos Aires

In Buenos Aires, fitting in is a more complicated process than simply knowing your steak, wine and football, or becoming a pro at multiple-dog walking, staring and protesting. Here are some ways you can act, live and love like a local. If you follow them you might just avoid men on passing motorbikes hollering “Gringa!” (but probably not). Whether it’s their amigo, boss or total stranger, Argentines peck each other once on the right cheek to say hi and bye…

 

Pescatarian Argentina: Where Do You Find the Best Fish Dishes?

It is well known that the riverside-dwelling people of Buenos Aires have a blind spot when it comes to fish. So, what is an omega-3-deficient fish-lover supposed to do in the city? Thankfully, It’s not all bad news. Fish is – excuse the pun – catching on. Or at least, it is in a handful of neighbourhoods frequented by foreigners and more adventurous locals. Read on to find out about the best places to get fresh fish and best pescatarian meals!

 

Minutas: Very Argentinian Fast Food

What are minutas? Think of them as Argentinian fast food. Forget the US culture of queuing at a counter and taking away paper cups of French fries; these short-order dishes are served as a sit-down meal, with china plates and waiter service.

 

The Pine Forest Beach of Carilo

When porteños need to escape the city smog, they head to Cariló, Argentina’s ‘green sand dune’ (its meaning in the Mapuche language). Breezy and easy to get to, Cariló is a top Argentina travel destination and the country’s most exclusive summer resort, a green lung which is a small slice of paradise: a pine forest next to the beach.

 

The Best Places for Brunch in Buenos Aires

Although the Spanglish verb lunchear has long formed part of the porteño vocabulary, it now needs to budge up and make room for brunchear, an Argentina food trend which has burst onto the scene – and probably popped a few seams as well, given the number of eateries which have mushroomed to serve up brunch of late. Buenos Aires does offer Argentine twists on classic American, English, and even Scandinavian midday meals.

 

Street Food in Argentina

It is often said that street food in Buenos Aires is a little lacking compared to some big cities. You will rarely see people eating and walking at the same time, and most porteños will take their coffee break sitting down rather than grabbing a paper cup to go. Yet that doesn’t mean you’ll go hungry. Read on and we’ll help you get the inside track on the best street food around.

 

What to Do When it Rains in Buenos Aires: Our Top 20 Tips

Full of extremes and drama, the skies of Buenos Aires are as tormented as its tango and its people. One minute the heavens above the Argentine capital are smiling – and the next they’ve opened up.

 

Teach Yourself Porteño: The Buenos Aires Lifestyle

‘Porteño’ is more than just a geographical indicator, it’s a way of being. Porteños have their own slang, their own fashion, their own complex psyche and their own attitude. So if you want to ‘do’ porteño, you’ll need more than a Spanish dictionary and a smile.

 
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