History

Visit the Argentina of Evita & Juan Perón

Argentina’s ‘It’ couple from his presidential election in 1946 until her death in 1952, Juan Domingo Perón (not usually known as JD) and María Eva Duarte (always known as Evita) shook up the country’s politics via the Partido Justicialista (PJ) party they founded, scandalised and angered the upper class, wriggled their way into the hearts of millions living below the poverty line with populist policies and added a thorough dose of socialist glamour as they led Argentina.

 

Top 10 Curious Facts About Argentina Wine

Few people beyond South American shores realise that Argentina is the fifth biggest wine producer in the world, making myriad varieties from vineyards that stretch from lofty Salta in the North West to the windswept river valleys of Patagonia in the south. From aromatic, spicy Torrontés to supple Pinot Noirs, by way of Viognier, Chardonnay, Cabernets Franc and Sauvingon, plus up-and-coming grapes such as Bonarda and Tempranillo, Argentina’s rich heritage of vines delivers a surprising wealth of styles.

 

Interactive Walking Tour Map of Buenos Aires History

From its beginnings as a riverside settlement, to its present day status as one of the world’s largest cities 400 years later, Buenos Aires has fit an awful lot in. It’s been wealthy and glorious, it’s been battered and broke. Its life, as scientist Jared Diamond would say, has ben shaped by guns, germs and steel. Yet such is the city’s short, intense life, most of the influential buildings are still here to be seen and explored, the museums add essential detail, while the tombs of the country’s great, good and downright dastardly can still be seen in the great city of the dead: Recoleta Cemetery.

 

450 Years of Wine in Argentina – A Potted History

The term “New World” is a pretty intriguing concept when it comes to Argentine winemaking given that its history stretches back some four and a half centuries. As with much of the Americas, it’s a story that involves Spanish conquistadors, Catholic missionaries, European migrants and, more latterly, the coming of the railway. To put this into perspective, the English Tudor monarch King Henry VIII had only just died when the first vitis vinifera cuttings (the wine grape vine) were planted in what was to become Argentine soil.

 

The Buenos Aires Jazz Scene

In the booming Argentina of the 1920s, the hip place to look to for ideas if you were an artist or intellectual was mother Europe. Jazz had just become all the rage over there, and hence arrived in Argentina not via the United States, but rather from the likes of Paris, London and Berlin. As the ‘new’ music began to take off in Buenos Aires in the ‘30s, it met with some resistance from certain quarters who viewed it as too foreign, and a threat to traditional types of music such as folklore and tango.

 

Polo – the Classic Sport of Argentine Gentlemen

Notwithstanding what happened recently in South Africa, there is one sport where Argentina dominates the world, and has done for over seventy years. Polo is a true national sport in the country and its popularity is second only to football. Championship matches in Argentina’s two biggest polo fields, in Palermo (in downtown Buenos Aires) and at the Hurlingham Club in the suburbs, attract huge crowds. During the season, games are televised almost daily…

 

Argentina’s Literary Legacy Inspires Today’s Creative Writers of Buenos Aires

Writers and poets have continued to be inspired by Buenos Aires’ melancholic and persevering atmosphere. The city is poetic – its history, folklore and romance are evident in every neighborhood, and the stories these elements have produced make it a destination for literary lovers and contemporary writers alike…

 

Argentinian Malbec – A Guide to the Grape’s History and Unique Style

Back in the Middle-Ages, Malbec was planted all over southern France. But it wasn’t known as Malbec. It had over a thousand synonyms, and besides Medieval wine drinkers knew precious little about grape varieties. But there was no doubt Malbec was highly thought of, especially up-river of Bordeaux, where it was blended with the even darker Tannat grape to make the famous ‘Black Wine of Cahors’…

 

The Lure of Tango in Argentina

They say that tango is the very expression of the Argentine soul. Certainly its roots are entwined with those of modern-day Argentina as the country emerged into a nation of immigrants in the late 19th century. It was a time of tremendous change especially in the port of Buenos Aires (B.A) which was swamped with Europeans seeking a new life in the New World. Soon the influx of Italians alone outnumbered the resident porteños – citizens of B.A, who were mainly descended from Spanish colonists and African slaves…

 

Pizza in Buenos Aires

Meat, meat, meat. There is no doubt that Argentina can do the Best Steak in the World ™ but there is one food that porteños adore almost as much as their beloved bovine: pizza. If you want to start a heated debate between two porteños (not tricky), either ask them to define Peronism, or ask them where to find the best pizza. It’s in their blood you see. The majority of Argentines claim Italian ancestry, significantly more than Spanish, which is why you’ll find fresh pasta outlets on every other block and pizzerias everywhere. But if you are looking for an authentic thin crust Roman pie, I’m afraid you are going to be disappointed. In Buenos Aires, pizzas are bready, smothered in an inch of cheese and loaded with toppings…

 
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